Tibet Prayer Wheel | Wall Hanging Wheel

SKU: 2713ENSPrayerWheel

  • Unique Work of Art (One of a kind)
  • Multiple Reproduction of the Original Thangka
  • Unique Work of Art (One of a kind)
  • Multiple Reproduction of the Original Thangka
  • Unique Work of Art (One of a kind)
  • Multiple Reproduction of the Original Thangka
  • Unique Work of Art (One of a kind)
  • Multiple Reproduction of the Original Thangka
  • Unique Work of Art (One of a kind)
  • Multiple Reproduction of the Original Thangka
  • Description

    Tibet Prayer Wheel

    About The Buddhist Prayer Wheel

    The Tibet Prayer Wheel is an integral part of Buddhist and Tibetan traditions. It is a beautifully crafted, hollow metal cylinder mounted on a rod or stand. The interior of the cylinder holds tightly scrolled paper or other material filled with printed or handwritten mantras. The prayer wheel is adorned with red gemstones and features an auspicious symbol carved outer wheel. The act of spinning the prayer wheel is believed to release positive energy and blessings, making it a cherished religious artifact in Buddhist and Tibetan communities.

    Introduction to Prayer Wheel

    A prayer wheel is a cylindrical wheel on a spindle used in Tibetan Buddhism. It is typically inscribed with the mantra "Om Mani Padme Hum" and rotated by hand as a form of spiritual practice and to accumulate merit. Spinning the wheel is believed to have the same spiritual benefits as verbally reciting the mantra. The use of prayer wheels is widespread in Tibetan Buddhism and has spread to other cultures.

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    Size: 13 cm(Height) x 28 cm(Base)
    Weight: 0.660 kg
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    How does Buddhist Prayer Wheel benefit us?

    The benefits associated with rotating the wheel are numerous. It promotes knowledge, compassion, and bodhicitta in the practitioner and improves siddhis (spiritual powers such as clairvoyance, precognition, etc.). The practitioner can repeat the mantra as often as possible while the wheel is rolling, maintaining a calm, meditative attitude. A Tibetan Buddhist tradition holds that at the completion of a practice session, one should dedicate any acquired merits to the benefit of all sentient beings. Then three times Om Ah Hum. This is usually among Tibetans after finishing any Buddhist practice, including the prayer wheel exercise.